Cultured kohlrabi dill pickles

by | Aug 3, 2010 | Columns, Eat. Heal. Live., Featured | 0 comments


cultured kohlrabi dill pickles

photo provided courtesy of affairsofliving.com


These naturally fermented, vinegar-free kohlrabi “pickles” are crunchy, salty, and tart, and very reminiscent of classic cucumber pickles. The natural fermentation process allows the development of beneficial bacteria and creates a live food that helps regulate digestion and restore proper intestinal flora, just like yogurt or kefir.


cultured kohlrabi dill picklesingredients
2-3 large kohlrabi bulbs
2 Tbsp high-quality sea salt (Himalayan pink salt, Real Salt, or Maldon are excellent)
2 Tbsp minced fresh dill
1 Tbsp whole yellow mustard seeds
2 garlic cloves, peeled, crushed, sliced in half lengthwise
optional: 1/2-1 tsp red pepper flakes
1-1 1/2 c filtered water

1 1-qt. glass canning jar, sterilized with boiling water


directions

  1. Wash and peel kohlrabi well, then slice into long sticks about 1/4″ x 1/4″. Arrange sticks in jar, layering with dill and garlic. As you are putting them in jar, press down lightly with a wooden spoon, and continue filling until there is about 1″ between kohlrabi and top of jar.
  2. Mix together salt, 1 cup of water, mustard seeds, and red pepper flakes, and pour over kohlrabi. Add additional water as necessary to cover kohlrabi and fill until there is 1” space at the top. Cover tightly.
  3. Let jar sit out at room temperature (ideally, 65º -70º F) for 3-4 days in a dark place on a plate or in a small dish to catch any possible leaks. Hotter temperatures will make things ferment more quickly, cooler temperatures will make for slower fermentation. You may notice hissing sounds coming from the jar – that’s a good thing! After 3 days, carefully open jar over the sink (pressure builds up and it may fizz when you open), and try a pickle. It will be very salty, and should taste tart, slightly sour and yeasty. If not sour enough for your tastes, put cover back on and let sit another day or two.
  4. Transfer to cold storage after fermenting. Can be eaten immediately, or kept for up to 6 months in the refrigerator. The flavor gets better with age!

makes 1 quart

recipe courtesy affairsofliving.com


  • Earthwalker is the username that PT founder Julie Genser created for her online interactions so many years ago when first creating Planet Thrive.

    Julie's (Earthwalker's) life was derailed over twenty years ago when she had a very large organic mercury exposure after she naively used a mouth thermometer to measure the temperature of just-boiled milk while making her very first pizza at home. The mercury instantly expanded into a gas form and exploded out the back of the thermometer right into her face. Unaware that mercury was the third most neurotoxic element on Earth, Julie had no idea she had just received a very high dose of a poisonous substance.

    A series of subsequent toxic exposures over the next few years -- to smoke from two fires (including 9/11), toxic mold, lyme disease, and chemical injuries -- caused catastrophic damage to her health. While figuring out how to survive day-to-day, and often minute-to-minute, she created Planet Thrive to help others avoid some of the misdiagnoses and struggles she had experienced.

    She has clawed her way over many health mountains to get to where she is today. She is excited to bring the latest iteration of Planet Thrive to the chronic illness community.

    In 2019, Julie published her very first cookbook e-book called Low Lectin Lunches (+ Dinners, Too!) after discovering how a low lectin, gluten free diet was helping manage her chronic fascia/muscle pain.

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