Orange poppy seed scones

by | Feb 11, 2015 | Columnists, Elana's Gluten-Free Pantry, Featured | 1 comment


Orange Poppy Seed Scones


I made these paleo Orange Poppy Seed Scones in honor of Valentine’s day. Truth be told, this holiday is not much of a thing in our house. If it’s convenient, my husband and I will go out to dinner on the night of Valentine’s day to celebrate each other and our relationship. Frankly though, I don’t put much stock in this holiday. Feel free to call me a grinch! However, when it comes to baking I’m a total holiday geek. And these heart shaped scones really bring out the baking nerd in me.

If you’re wondering how to make healthy scones you’re totally in luck today! This gluten-free, dairy-free scone recipe contains only seven ingredients –almond flour, salt, baking soda, honey, egg, orange zest, and poppy seeds.

If you are looking for a nut-free scone recipe, try my Paleo Chocolate Chip Scones. If you’re in need of an egg-free recipe, well, I can’t be of quite as much help with that. I haven’t had much success, in creating grain-free baked goods that are egg-free as well. If you do decide to experiment with this recipe please leave a comment and let us know your results! The only way to find out if a substitution works is to try it.

ingredients

  • 2 cups blanched almond flour
  • ¼ teaspoon celtic sea salt
  • ¼ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ cup honey
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon orange zest
  • 1 tablespoon poppy seeds

directions

  1. In a food processor combine, almond flour, salt, and baking soda
  2. Pulse in honey, eggs, and orange zest
  3. Very briefly pulse in poppy seeds
  4. Roll out dough to ½-inch thick between 2 pieces of parchment paper
  5. Chill dough in freezer for 15 minutes
  6. Using a heart shaped cookie cutter, cut hearts out of dough
  7. Transfer to a parchment lined baking sheet
  8. Bake at 350° for 25-30 minutes
  9. Cool for 30 minutes
  10. Serve

makes 6 scones

When I made these Orange Poppy Seed Scones, I used a heart shaped cookie cutter of a fairly large size. In fact, the cookie cutter measured 2-½ inches wide at its widest point. If you use a smaller cookie cutter you will need to reduce the baking time of the scones or they will overcook. Likewise, if you make larger heart scones you will likely need to bake them for longer.

recipe courtesy elanaspantry.com

 


  • Earthwalker is the username that PT founder Julie Genser created for her online interactions so many years ago when first creating Planet Thrive.

    Julie's (Earthwalker's) life was derailed over twenty years ago when she had a very large organic mercury exposure after she naively used a mouth thermometer to measure the temperature of just-boiled milk while making her very first pizza at home. The mercury instantly expanded into a gas form and exploded out the back of the thermometer right into her face. Unaware that mercury was the third most neurotoxic element on Earth, Julie had no idea she had just received a very high dose of a poisonous substance.

    A series of subsequent toxic exposures over the next few years -- to smoke from two fires (including 9/11), toxic mold, lyme disease, and chemical injuries -- caused catastrophic damage to her health. While figuring out how to survive day-to-day, and often minute-to-minute, she created Planet Thrive to help others avoid some of the misdiagnoses and struggles she had experienced.

    She has clawed her way over many health mountains to get to where she is today. She is excited to bring the latest iteration of Planet Thrive to the chronic illness community.

    In 2019, Julie published her very first cookbook e-book called Low Lectin Lunches (+ Dinners, Too!) after discovering how a low lectin, gluten free diet was helping manage her chronic fascia/muscle pain.

1 Comment

  1. Linda Simon

    Flax egg should work.

    Lightly cream 1 tablespoon of flax meal with three tablespoons water.

    Argarve syrup, maple syrup or rice bran syrup can also be used instead of the honey to make it 100% vegan.

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